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Full text of "X Collection 317"



X Collection 



INDEX 



Page:. 



Barcode Number 



LIBRARY OF CONGRESS 

■■■!!! !!!! M !! jj!j! H 1 ! 1 INI1 ni'i ■!■'■ 'ii'i I'm iifi mi 




020 534 923 6 



LIBRARY OF CONGRESS 

i iiiin iitn ii ii inn iiiii mil inn kiii iiiii him mti mi tin 



Box Number 



317 




Total of 
Volumes 



Call Number 



^ 



J2_ 



befall 



' 



Duynq-DUnbo 






W 



ZBI.IS-mu 27 



A*K^ 



2^ 



2f 






31 






€7X^3-299.^ 



2- 



£ \w (m~ w 1) 



5^ UM(w-w] 



clc96 000414 



1 



X-DU420 #| 

'^ REASONS w 



FOR PROMOTING THE CULTIVATION 



OP THE 



NEW ZEALAND FLAX. 






I 



BY 

F. DILLON BELL 

AND 

FREDERICK YOUNG Jun. 



I 



LONDON : 
SMITH, ELDER AND CO., CORNHILL. 

1842. 



Price One Shilling. 



I 



. 



I (inhibition af ^oUnial |3raducts, | 

GHRISTCHURCH. 



m ISAN&AHUA AKD 




X-.DU 420 



■L&72.. 






*y 



«li« 



HISTORICAL STARRA/riVE j^ 



(\ A T A L O <J S S O F 1 X II }. )3 1 T £ . 

WITH [•AltTRTI.Vl^ OF TrffrH&fcgRAt. UOF.B StOJI-Mi 
CLAIMS KKrUKSK^KD. 



REEFTON - 

I'HINTKD AT THK ' IXAXUA HI.A HERALD" OFFICB, BB<>A1>WAY, 

I'KOVINCF. OF XKL30N-. SEW ZKAI.AXU. 

JiDCCCLXXlI. 



VoG ^eWa^DCNi. 



^g^^^P^^I!^^^ 






I 



%■> 




Rev. R. BURROWS 







IN THE NORTH, in 1845. 



BucfclanS : 

UPION AND CO. 




1886. 



I 



Y J 








Su6?i*fied u'nsler Cfte auAaiceA o£ tfie 

X-DU42Q 






■H , 





d>afe<§Loman 



-^^J^ Society. ^t%^ 




g>frao J^cat)C5 i 



FBOM THE 



f ^arlg^isforg of §a\xtexb\xxs 'I 



iig George £lobcrt $art. 



1. 



ft 



* 



IFIRIOIE OHSTE SHILLING. 




* 



& 



■ 



PB1NTBD AT DUE OFFICE OF "THE EBBSs'.' COMPAMT LIMITED, PBINTEBS 
AND BOOKBINDERS, CASHEL STBEET. 




><^^ 





X- D U 420 



*5 



THE 



*# 




INDUSTRIES OF NEW ZEALAND 



BX 



W. N. BLAIR, M. Inst., C.E. 



AN ADDRESS 



DELIVERED TO THE 



Iqdiidriiil jftawfwfoil of %n|t#urg t 



AT CHRlSTCHURCH, N.Z., ON 






THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 1887 



PRICE-ONE 




SI SHILLING. 



F. JMKINS, President of the Association in the Chair. 




Cjfrisicjrurtlr, $.8. : 

Printed by the ' Press ' Company, Ltd,, Printers and Bookbinders, 
Cashel Street. 

1887. 




c 



T3^r 



X-DU 420 



EEMINISCENCES 



tffe 



MINISTER FOR NATIVE AFFAIRS IN NEW ZEALAND: 



BEING A CORRECTED REPORT IN THE NEW ZEALAND "HANSARD" OP A SPEECH 

DELIVERED BY 



HON. ME. J. C. EICHMOND, 



IN THE 



LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL ON WEDNESDAY. AUGUST 1, 1888, 



IN REPLY TO DEFAMATORY PASSAGES CONTAINED IN 



RUSDEN'S "fflSTOKY OF NEW ZEALAND." 



WELLINGTON: 

BY AUTHORITY: GEORGE DEDSBUBY, QOTBBNMENT PRINTER. 
1888. 




THE OTJBO G0LDFIELD8: 



THEIR PAST HISTORY, 
THEIR PRESENT POSITION, 

AND THEIR 

FUTURE PROSPECTS. 



BY 



•The Otago Daily Times" Special Commissioner. 



Reprinted from "The Otago Daily Times." 



§nnt bin i 

Tim Otaoo Daily Tmn akd Witxibs Ncwkimitk... 
COMPAirr, Likitrd. 




j*).*tNS£Y, 



O 



CburcD 
Work 




among 

tlK 

rcaories, 



jk^f^^ 



rd 



- .. .--. - -~ i 



X- D U 420 



373 fi\) 

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH. 



REMINISCENCES 



AND 



EXPERIENCES 



OF AN 



EARLY COLONIST. 



i 



MiSTBKTuK, N«W ZEAI^IND ! 

Printed by E. H. Wftddiagton, Terry Street. 
1898. 



y-DU</2o.2 < ? 

MAORI BIOGRAPHIES. 



$ 



u 



SKETCHES 



OF 



OLD NEW ZEALAND. 



Compiled by JAMES COWAN. 



DESCRIPTIVE CATALOGUE 
of Maori Portraits 
painted by 

HERR G. LINDAUER. 



Printed foe H. E. PARTRIDGE, Auckland. 
By Tne Brett Printing and Publishing Company, Limited, Shortland Street. 



e 



X-D'J ^20 



-#13 



1 



STATISTICAL VIEW 



OF 



FIFTY YEARS' PROGRESS 



IN 



NEW ZEALAND, 



1854-1903. 



Compiled from Official Sources. E. J. VON DADELSZEN, Registrar General. 




WELLINGTON. 

BY AUTHORITY: JOHN MACKAY, GOVBBNMBNT PRINTEB. 
1904. 



V 



=*> 







c 



i 



X-DU 420 

EARLY HISTORY 



»Zq 



fiew Zealand £osf ©fffce. 



Compiled by D. Bobiet ;on. 




Sji Jmtboriiij of the |)ostmaster-<§tntrul. 



WELLINGTON, N.Z. 
JOHN MACKAY, GOVERNMENT 1'KINTEK. 

1905. 







■X-DU k2Q*Zf 







tub 
early settlement 
onne 

TOKOHIfllHIBD PLAIN. 

By 

Alexander Brown, 
Milton. 



Reprinted from the Bruce Herald, October 15, 1906, 
and following issues. 



Printed at the Bruce Herald Office, Union Street. Milton 




A r 



'*- 



«• 



1907. I 

X- 






"THE COLONIST" 



JUBILEE . . 
SOUVENIR. 




PRESENTED 

TO 

SUBSCRIBERS. 

NELSON, N.2. 

23 AD OCT., 1907. 




IN MEMORIAM. 

Mr E. \ Meredith. 

A Notable Pioneer Colonist. 

[Extract from " Wairarapa Daily Times," 
Tcesday, March 5th, 1007.] 



alert and notable figure, to 
be seen any day in Masterton, for a 
generation or more will no more be 
met in Queen-street, for Mr E V 
Meredith of Llandaff, has joined the 
^reat majority. Hale, in spite of a 
g^ESe of 7 years his end came 
somewhat unexpectedly. It is not »o 
mW days since his familiar form 
wa" seen in town, and his ever 
Courteous greeting extended to his 
many friends aud acquaintances 

The late Mr Edwin Meredith was, 
in some respects, a rather ' ™Xw*£e 
man, who was content to follow the 
career of a pioneer settler and ot a 
good colonist" but who was qualified 
fo adorn a high public position His 
natural gifts, his culture, and a cer- 
tain otaSr of manner which never 
failed him, conferred upon him a dis- 
tinction which no pubic position 
could have enhanced, SU kM ™ ; 
deuce in this district, and the intelli- 
gent interest which he ever displayed 
fu questions of public interest, made 
nlm a prominent man, although he 
was content to merely paly a modest 
part as a fireside politician. His 
beautiful home on the Upper Plain 
had a greater attraction for him than 
public assemblages. In Masterton he 
knew everybody and everybody knew 
him aud who was there of his ac- 
quaintance but bore willing testimony 
to his never-failing courtesy to one 
aud all. If in Masterton there has 
been au uncrowned Prince, to whom 
men were willing to make obeisance, 
we lose him by the death of Mr 
Meredith. 

For a good many years the late Mr 
Meredith was restrained by ill-health 
from the pursuit of a more strenuous 
career for which he was otherwise so 
well equipped. We regret to hear, 
also that the last few days of his 
existence were saddened by severe 
physical suffering, so that death must 



' X-DU42Q 

almost have come as a happy release. 
For five-and-twenty years or more the 
writer has known the late Mr Mere- 
dith, and lie may say that the morahe 
knew of him and the better he c^me 
to understand him, the greater grew 
his regard and respect for the fine and 
nolle qualities which were his wdtent 
characteristics. We feel that Master- 
ton, and indeed the whole Wairarapa, 
is the poorer bv his removal by death 
from amongst us. 

The late Mr Meredith was eighty 
years of age, being born in Tasmania 
in the year 1827. He was a son ot an 
ofd Peninsula officer Those who 
have visited Hobart will recall a fine 
statue erected near the town in 
memory of a member of the Meredith 
family who held a very dUtinmiahed 
position in that colony. The late 
Mr Meredith was a New Zealand 
colonist of fifty-seven years' standing 
He first of all took up a Crown run ot 
80,000 acres in Otago under bir 
George Grey's pastoral regulations 
S ft here gUaated as a Shepherd 
King In 1853 Mr Meredith pur- 
chased 2000 acres of land in the 
Hawke's Bay district, but owing to 
land troubles had to surrender this 
property. In the following year he 
settled y on the South Bank of the 
Whareama, acquiring a lease of 15,000 
acres of land, which he subsequently 
converted into a freehold. Even 
Shenherd Kings in the earlier days of 
Klony haf to endure W*g£ 
ships and take grave risks before they 
could bring an estate into protnabie 
occupation 8 For five-and -twenty .years 
Mr Meredith resided with his family 
on his Whareama run, and to 1W1 
he came to live at Llandaff on the 
Upper Plain. When he first settled 
in Masterton he became a member 
of the Masterton Boad Board, and 
Utei -a member of the Wairarapa 
North County Council. At one time, 
foo The took a prominent position in 
the Masterton Agricultural and 
Pastoral Association. So far as Is 
health and strength permitted him he 
lived an active and a strenuous Me 
aud leaves behind him many ch iMren 
and grand-children, who will, in the 
vears to come, recall with pride and 
affection tt°e founder of the Meredith 
family in New Zealand. 



A- 



DUHXo 



ti( 



r- 



THE 



c 



L 



ME1KLE SENSATION ! 

HORRORS AND INJUSTICE IN NEW ZEALAND. 

Prison Department, 

,. T ,. Wellington, N.Z., 26th May, 1888. 

madam —l am directed by the Honourable the Minister of Justice to 
acknowledge the receipt of the following documents from you :-lst letter to 
His Excellency the Governor, dated 7th May ; 2nd letter to Lady Jervois. 
dated 16th April ; 3rd letter to the Honourable the Minister of Justice, dated 
the .15th April ; and a letter to the Hon. G. F. Richardson, dated 24th April, 
and to inform you, in reply, that all the Plaints set forth in these documents 
have been carefully considered and fully inquired into, with the result that 
the Hon. Mr. Fergus can see no grounds to justify him in interfering with 
the sentence passed upon your husband. 

I have the honour to be, Madam, Your obedient servant, 

A. Hume, 
,, ,.,..,, Inspector of Prisons. 

Mrs. j. J. Meikle, 

Hope-field, Wyndham, Southland. 
The above clearly shows that, once in jail, like the fly in the honev-pot, 
you are deal to the world; and Captain Hume took good care to' keep 
Meikle in prison. He, Captain Hume, was also the Commissioner of Police ; 
he ruled the roost in both Departments. 

Nelson, 20th November, 1888. 
Madam,— Your letter of the 12th inst. was forwarded to me here to-day. I 
regret very much to say that I am afraid I cannot do anything to assist yon 
in your great distress. Ycu ask if I think there is any hope of your husband's 
sentence being reduced. Well, I must be honest with you, and tell you at 
once candidly that I do not think there is the remotest chance of the Govern- 
ment reducing Meikle's sentence. The fact of one man getting three vears 
for sheep-stealing, and another getting seven years for the same offence, in 
my opinion has nothing to do with the matter. You ask me to gi/e some 
message to your husband ; but you must be surely aware that I am pnhibited 
from doing any such thing. 

I remain, yours faithfully, 

A. Hume, Inspector of Prsons. 
Lyttelton Prison, 

December the 28th, \889. 
To His Excellency the Governor of the 
Colony of New Zealand. 

PETITION OF JOHN JAMES MEIKLE. 
Your Petitioner humbly showeth : — 

1st. That your Petitioner, petitions on the following grounds : — That your 
Petitioner is innocent of the crime that he now suffers for. 

2nd. Your Petitioner, having sent Two Petitions to the late Governor, Sir 
W. Jervo.s. and the reply sen: back :— '.' No grounds." 

. T 3rt J' J Yom "? et i ,ioner draws your Excellency's attention :— That HisHonour 
Mr. Judge Maid, was charged on the 19th day of August, 1S89 before a 
Select Committee of the Legislative Council in Wellington, with Pressure 
and Prejudice in your Petitioner's case; and it has been clearly prored by 
the Colonial Secretary that Judge Ward-" Was under pecuniary obligations 
to the Prosecuting Company, which Prosecuted Your Petitioner as there was 
no person present to appear for Your Petitioner before the Legislative 
Committee. ° 

Your Petitioner Begs that Your Excellency will Grant Your Petitioner 
Four Sheets of Foolscap and One Large Envelope, to give a written.repoit 
of Your Petitioner s Case to Mr. Jelhcoe, Barrister and Solicitor of Welling- 
ton, to enable him to take what steps he may think proper to have Justice 
done to Your Petitioner. 



I 



w T Exce,le l nc y u wl11 see - W looking into all the facts of the Case, Judge 
Ward must either have been a Persecuted Judge, or Your Petitioner is wrong- 
fully Convicted, and the Jury mis-directed. By granting the above request 
xour .Petitioner will ever pray. 

w„„i , , j feigned) J. J. MEIII-E. 

Keply came back:- No grounds to grant my request" (to allow Meikle 
to write to Mr. Jelhcoe). 

Tr.H;.c ii a.- r. c ., Lyttelton Prison. 

±o nib Excellency the Governor of the 

Colony of New Zealand. 

PETITION OF JOHN JAMES MEIKLE. A Prisoner in H.M.Gaol. 
Yotir Petitioner humbly showeth : — 

1st That Your Petitioner Petitions on the following grounds — 

2nd. Tha , Your Petltl oner did not receive a fair trial, through Judge W am 
2 Mder pecuniary obligations to the prosecuting Company, and 6r, the 
»~c I Judge Wart, be. ng a partner with the two Directors of the Company in 
a* Estate known as Waioolo Estate m Southland 

Mr McDonald, the Crown Prosecutor, and Mr. Harvey, the Company 
Solicitor, and Mr. Denmston, Solicitor, all three who Prosecuted Your 
Petitioner, are interested in the Company u»».u 

Mr Dcnnistons brother-in-law was a Director of the Company, and his 

, 1 ^"'MnilH" s r ga ' e 'n Vas former 'y Manager of the Company. 

3rd Mr. McDonald the Crown Prosecutor, was invested financially, and 
Mr. Harvev, solicitor tor the Company 

4th The Principal witness, who was to get £50. Swore in the Lower 
Ceurthewas to get nothing Md signed bis depositions; he swore in ,h e 
Supreme Court he was to tret /5<1 ar,H ^^;.._.j u: ,r _, . .u «,. 



; t0 gPt £50, and oerinwd hw 



.,,. ,,.;th otHo-., 



the Commissioner of Police, and ^Inspector of Prisons." Nothini 
done to get Meikle justice. Mr. Hume was factotum of the li 
Department in New Zealand.] 

Department of Justice, . 

Wellington, New Zealand, 

ox,,, , 4th September, 18' 

blR,— I have the honour to acknowledge the receipt of your letter o 
number and date quoted in the margin [1st instant], with enclosure 
Mr J. J. Meikle, on the subject of the case of one Lambert, committe. 
trial on a charge of perjury. 

In reply, I have to inform you that if Mr. Meikle wishes for a chant 
venue, he should make application to the Supreme Court ; but tha 
Government cannot interfere in the matter. 

As regards the payment of the witnesses, as the prosecution is a pr 

one, these expenses are not payable by the Crown. 

Your most obedient servant, 

W. P. Reeves, 

w „ . . . _ For the Minister of Justi. 

W. Hutchison, Esq., 

M.H.R., Wellington. 

[The above shows how Mi? Pember Reeves refused to prosecute Lam 

the perjurer. WhatTs the good of the Justice Department ?] 

JUSTICE STILL DELAYED. 
IN "GOD'S OWN COUNTRY." 

Report of the M to Z Committee in Meikle'* Case. 

Abstract of Committee's Report referred to : 
The Committee are of opinion that after eliminating Lambert's evide 
who has since been convicted, and is now serving a sentence for Deri 
there was not sufficient evidence adduced at Petitioner's trial to warrant 
conviction on the charge preferred against him. That the request of Pet 
ner to have his name removed from the prison records of the colonv m< 
the serious consideration of the Crown, and recommends the Governmer 
make provision on the Supplementary Estimates for the payment of a sui 
money by way of compensation for the losses he has sustained in connec 
with his business, the legal costs incurred in defending the charge prefei 
against him, and in securing the conviction of Lambert for perjury and 
by way of compensation for the imprisonment he has suffered. ' 
n.K r, . u ,o„. George Friend, 

W?ilHo e n'M K ,p ,■ C1 f k °f the House of Representative: 

Will Hon. Members of Parliament let the public know the reason that 

above recommendation was not carried out 14 years ago by the Governme 

The^Committee spent threedays enquiring into the wrongful convicfer 

8s£ww N ™ S ^ te< ? ° n th ^ 29i \ ° ctober . !895 (recorded in Hansard p 
858) that Meikle lost, through his wrongful incarceration, some £51 
He hoped the members of the Committee would support him in recomme 
ing the Government to put a sufficient sum on the Estimates, so that w 
the Government came to settle the matter they would have a proper sum 
the Estimates out of which to do so. Mr Seddon said that Ministers 1 
been working day and night, ana when Ministers desired to be relieved 
some of the work the House would not have it ; they were not soine toc< 
mit the country to a large sum of money without due deliberation This ^ 
not the only case and a dangerous precedent might be •stablished He 
tended to go carefully through the papers 

Mr Smith, Mr Collins, Mr Willis and Mr W. Fraser were all members 
the Committee. 

. J£, M u C ^° m ° Ved , l ? e a< Jj°urnment ° f the House on the 10th Septemb 
1896 (which is recorded in Hansard, page 490) to enable the memoers 
I arhament to discuss the Meikle case. Hon. T. Mc Kenzie stated during 
debate (Hansard page 498) he would like to say. in connection with the n 
Meikle, of whom so much had been said that afternoon, those of them v. 
came from the South Island knew perfectly well that, whatever mieht be s 
against Meikle in other connections, the charge on which he suffered t 
leng term ot imprisonment he was entirely innocent of Tnat was clea 
shown ; and he thought, if that was so, Parliament should give him tl 
redress which he was entitled to. Mr. Seddon stated, during fhe debate 
page 499), he must plead guilty to the fact that, when he left the House tl 
atternoon he left in anything but a happy frame of mind ; and he h 
very good reasons for it, the whole of the afternoon having been wasted 

»f CU , S ^ nS W , h ,! 0h had taken place on the questions. It was not wasted 
Mr. Willis : His accuser perjured himself. Members of the Committee cai 
down to the House and said, in reference to certain persons "We deck 
them innocent," though the parties had been convicted by a Court of ll 
after a fair trial. The Judge who tried the case entirely differed from t 
opinion .held by the Committee, notwithstanding what had taken place sin< 
The judge held that Meikle was property convicted, and that he was gui 
of the offence for which he suffered. That was the position It had be 
27, XE& P T ? at G , overnmen t °t.ght, at all events, to pay the expens 
that Meikle had incurred m proving his innocence, by prosecuting a witne 
for perjury ; but it would be said, the moment the Government rnmmitt 
themselves by doing that they should pay so much money "compenTa 
for the sufferings endured by him m Gaol-that would be the next a?gume. 
Sir R. Stout in the same debate stated (on page 501) it was quite right f 
the Premier to insist on having the matter carefully sifted before the Colo, 
paid any money. They were all liable to be carried away by svmoathvsnm 
times, and no doubt the Petitioner made out a strong case when he IhnZ 
that the main witness was convicted of perjury. He understood that'll 
Committee had ascertained that one or more of the Jury had said that li- 
lt not been for this man's evidence, the Conviction would not have 'be! 
sustained. That made out a very strong case. Sir R. Stout ought to ha- 

stated that h.= T-T^r.™,. AT- t..~,: Ti,:n , •. . _ n V l ""«» 



\tn\H7o fifcf 



ZH 



THE 



i 



MEIKLE SENSATION! 



HORRORS AND INJUSTICE IN NEW ZEALA ND- 

Prison Department, 

Wellington, N.Z,, 26th May, 1888. 
Madam,— I am directed by the Honourable the Minister of Justice to 
acknowledge the receipt of the following documents from you:— 1st letter to 
His Excellency the Governor, dated 7th May ; 2nd letter to Lady Jervois, 
dated 16th April ; 3rd letter to the Honourable the Minister of Justice, dated 
the 15th April; and a letter to the Hon. G. F. Richardson, dated 24th April, 
and to inform you, in reply, that all the Plaints set forth in these documents 
have been carefully considered and fully inquired into, with the result that 
the Hon. Mr. Fergus can see no grounds to justify him in interfering with 
the sentence passed upon your husband. 

1 have the honour to be, Madam, Your obedient servant, 

A. Hume, 

Inspector of Prisons. 
Mrs. J. J. Meikle, 

Kopefield, Wyndham, Southland. 

The above clearly shows that, once in jail, like the fly in the honey-pot, 
you are dead to the world ; and Captain Hume took good care to keep 
Meikle in prison. He, Captain Hume, was also the Commissioner of Police; 
he ruled the roost in both Departments. 

Nelson, 20th November, 188S. 

Madam, — Your letter of the 12th inst. was forwarded to me here to-day I 
regret very much to say that I am afraid I cannot do anything to assist yon 
in your great distress. Yen ask if I think there is any hope of your husband's 
sentence being reduced. Well, I must be honest with you, and tell you at 
once candidly that I do not think there is the remotest chance of the Govern- 
ment reducing Meikle's sentence. The fact of one man getting three years 
for sheep-stealing, and another getting seven years for the same offence, in 
my opinion has nothing to do with the matter. You ask me to give some 
message to yutir husband ; but you must be surely aware that I am prohibited 
from doing any such thing. 

I remain, yours faithfully, 

A. Hume, Inspector of Prisons. 

Lyttelton Prison, 

December the 28th, 1JS0. 
To His Excellency the Governor of the 
Colony of New Zealand. 

PETITION OF JOHN JAMES MEIKLE. 
Your Petitioner humbly showeth : — 

1st. That your Petitioner, petitions on the following grounds : — That your 
Petitioner is innocent of the crime that he now suffers for. 

2nd. Your Petitioner, having sent Two Petitions to the late Governor, Sir 
W: Jervo's. and the reply seni back : — " No grounds." 

3rd. Your Petitioner draws your Excellency's attention:— That His Honour 
Mr. Judge Ward, was charged on the 19th day of August. 1889, before a 
Select Committee of the Legislative Council in Wellington, with Pressure 
and Prejudice in your Petitioner's case ; and it has been clearly proved by 
the Colonial Secretary that Judge Ward—" Was under pecuniary obligations 
,o the Prosecuting Company, which Prosecuted Your Petitioner/as tberewas 
„o person present to appear for Your Petitioner before the Legislative 
Committee. 

Your Petihoner Begs that Your Excellency will Grant Your Petitioner 
Four Sheets of Foolscap and One Large Envelope, to give a written report 
of Your Petitioner's Case to Mr. Jellicoe, Barrister and Solicitor, of Welling- 
ton, to enible him to take what steps he may think proper to have Justice 
done to Your Petitioner. 

Your Excellency will see, by looking into all the facts of the Case, Judge 
Ward must either have been a Persecuted Judge, or Your Petitioner is wrong- 
fully Convicted, and the Jury mis-directed. By granting the above request 
Your Petitioner will ever pray. 

„ , , i ..xt , (Signed) J. J. Meikle. 

Reply came back - No grounds to grant my request " (to allow Meikle 
to write to Mr. Jellicoe). 

_ ... _ ii .. ^ , Lyttelton Prison. 

To His Excellency tne Governor of the 
Colony of New Zealand. 

PETITION OF JOHN JAMES MEIKLE. A Prisoner in H.M. Gaol. 
Yotir Petitioner humbly showeth ■ — 

l St A TW Y v ^ P ^ ti,ioner Petitions on the following grounds :- 

2nd. That Your Petitioner did not receive a fair trial through Judge Ward 

b ^„Ti e w a e r C H Un ; ary <***&**» t0 '«« prosecuting Company, and he. the 

» Estate known'-, w ■* T^ With the two Directors of the Company in 

v7 at r> ,, , Wa ' 0ol ° Esta,e '» Southland. 
Soltei'tor and V th I e , Crown Prosecutor, and Mr. Harvey, the Company's 
K itione'r a e in P^ St< ?' Solicitor, all three who Prosecuted Your 

» n ' interested in the Company. 
latefatW rr n \ b T the T r " in - law was a Erector of the Company, and his 

3rd Mr' A. n ' J 7 H Bathi >' ate ' was formerly Manager of the Company. 
v „ *' r ; McD onald the Crown Prosecutor, was inteiested financially, and 

4 h , T bo!,cltor fo r the Company. 
C.nri'hi r ' nnc 'P al witness, who was to get /50. Swore in the Lower 
Sunr^rnrT r- ?i gSt nothin Z- an d signed his depositions ; he swore in the 
supreme Court he was to net /5fl anrl nm-inr-^ hiZ^u ->-_,. ...;.u r-th*,-,. 



the Commissioner of Police, and |Inspector of Prisons. Nothing wa 
done to get Meikle justice. Mr. Hume was factotum of the Justic 
Department in New Zealand.] 

Department of Justice, 

Wellington, New Zealand, 

4th September, 1S94. 
Sir,— I have the honour to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of th 
number and date quoted m the margin [1st instant] , with enclosure frot 
Mr. J. J. Meikle, on the subject of the case of one Lambert, committed fc 
trial on a charge of perjury. 

In reply, I have to inform you that if Mr. Meikle wishes for a change t 
venue, he should make application to the Supreme Court ; but that th 
Government cannot interfere in the matter. 

As regards the payment of the witnesses, as the prosecution is a privat 
one, these expenses are not payable by the Crown. 
Your most obedient servant, 

W. P. Reeves, 

For the Minister of Justice. 
W. Hutchison, Esq., 

M.H.R., Wellington. 
[The above shows how Mr. Pember Reeves refused to prosecute Lamben 
the perjurer. What is the good of the Justice Department ?] 

JUSTICE STILL DELAYED. 
IN "GOD'S OWN COUNTRY." 

Report of the M to Z Committee in Meikle's Case. 

Abstract of Committee's Report referred to ; 
The Committee are of opinion that after eliminating Lambert's evidence 
who has since been convicted, and is now serving a sentence for perjury 
there was not sufficient evidence adduced at Petitioner's trial to warrant hi 
conviction on the charge preferred against him. That the request of Petitio 
ner to have his name removed from the prison records of the colony merit 
the serious consideration of the Crown, and recommends the Government t. 
make provision on the Supplementary Estimates for the pavment of a sum c 
money by way of compensation for the losses he has sustained in connectioi 
with his business, the legal costs incurred in defending the charge preferrei 
against him, and in securing the conviction of Lambert for perjury ; and als. 
by way of compensation for the imprisonment he has suffered. 

George Friend, 
; 9th October, 1895. Clerk of the House of Representatives. 

I Will Hon. Members of Parliament let the public know the reason that th 
above recommendation was not carried out 14 years ago by the Government 
The Committee spent three days enquiring into the wrongful conviction o 
Meikle. 

Mr McNab stated on the 29th October. 1895 (recorded in Hansard pag 
858) that Meikle lost, through his wrongful incarceration, some /5000 
He hoped the members of the Committee would support him in recommend 
ing the Government to put a sufficient sum on the Estimates, so that whei 
the Government came to settle the matter they would have a proper sum oi 
the Estimates out of which to do so. Mr Seddon said that Ministers hat 
been working day and night, ana when Ministers desired to be relieved o 
some of the work the House would not have it ; they were net going to com 
mit the country to a large sum of money without due deliberation. This wa.' 
not the only case, and a dangerous precedent might be astablished. He in 
tended to go carefully through the papers. 

Mr Smith, Mr Collins, Mr Willis and Mr W. Fraser were all members o 
the Committee. 

Mr McNaD moved the adjournment of the House on the 10th September 
1896 (which is recorded in Hansard, page 490) to enable the meraoers o 
Parliament to discuss the Meikle case. Hon. T. Mc Kenzie stated during th< 
debate (Hansard page 498) he would like to say, in connection with the mai 
Meikle, of whom so much had been said that afternoon, those of them whi 
came irom the South Island knew perfectly well that, whatever might be sak 
against Meikle in other connections, the charge on which he suffered this 
leng term of imprisonment he was entirely innocent of. Tnat was clearlj 
shown ; and he thought, if that was so, Parliament should give him tha 
redress which he was entitled to. Mr. Seddon stated, during the debate (or 
page 499), he must plead guilty to the fact that, when he left the House thai 
afternoon, he left in anything but a happy frame of mind; and he hac 
very good reasons for it, the whole of the afternoon having been wasted by 
discussions which had taken place on the questions. It was not wasted. B\ 
Mr. Willis : His accuser perjured himself. Members of the Committee came 
down to the House and said, in reference to certain persons, "We declare 
them innocent," though the parties had been convicted by a Court of Law, 
after a fair trial. The Judge who tried the case entirely differed from the 
opinion held by the Committee, notwithstanding what had taken place since. 
The Judge held that Meikle was properly convicted, and that he was guilty 
of the offence for which he suffered. That was the position. It had beeD 
very nicely put that the Government ought, at all events, to pay the expenses 
that Meikle had incurred in proving his innocence, by prosecuting a witness 
for perjury ; but it would be said, the moment the Government committed 
themselves by doing that, they should pay so much money as compensation 
for the sufferings endured by him in Gaol — that would be the next argument. 
Sir R. Stout, in the same debate, stated (on page 501) it was quite right for 
the Premier to insist on having the matter carefully sifted before the Colony 
paid any money. They were all liable to be carried away by sympathy some- 
times, and no doubt the Petitioner made out a strong case when he showed 
that the main witness was convicted of perjury. He understood that the 
Committee had ascertained that one or more of the Jury had said that had 
it not been for this man '»< evidence, the Conviction would not have been 
sustained. That made outjja very strong case. Sir R. Stout ou^ht to have 

stated that hie I4r.nr.Mr Mr Tnstire Williams had said whor. T -_.U-_^ .—.. 





SJAT^JICAL VIEW 

FIFTY YEARS' PROGRESS 



IN 



4 



NEW ZEALAND. 



1858 - 1»0^. 



f 



tompilta from Official Sources. E. J. VON DADUSZEH, fteglstrar-Gentral. 



ISSUED BY THE 

GOVERNMENT DEPARTMENT OF TOURIST AND HEALTH RESORTS. 





WELLINGTON. 

*Y AUTHORITY ! JOHN MACKAY, GOVMNMENT PRINTS*. 
1909. 




I 












/ 








{ 



TAPANUI STATION... 

do 

Broofcsbale 
Estate. 
•1858-1910. 



TOGETHER WITH SOME. 



EKRLY OTMO 
PIONEERING . . 
EXPERIENCES. 



(JDapumii : 

QUIN & RODGEH, PBINTEBS AND PUBLISHERS. 














m 



B« 



Mi 



THE FIRST FIFTY YEARS 

OF THE 

AUCKLAND INSTITUTE 



AND ITS FUTURE AIMS 





. ■ 




X-DU 420 




OTAGO 

Seventieth 
Anniversary. 

1848-1918. 



Edited by the 

REV. ALEX. WHYTE 

tNjaoal Chaplain and Chaplain to the Forces, 

Port Chalmers. 



1st Edition— 1000, August, 1918, 
2nd „ 1000, September. 
3rd „ 3000, November. 



Otago Early Settlers' Association, Dunedin 
Old Identities* Association, Port Chalmers. 

Price 1/- 







X-DU 420 



THE 



W *Z1 



iscovery &4Ke-Discovery 
of ffflt ellington ^ arbour 



WITH REMARKS BY EARLY VOYAGERS 
« « ON THE LOCAL NATIVES, ETC. « * 



3t==£5- 



BY 

ELSDON BEST. 



* 
• 




Cook's " Endeavour ' 



J 




X-D'J 420 



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TARANAKI 

EIGHTY YEARS AGO 

1840—1842 



An Historical Sketch dealing with the 
Establishment of the Town and Settle- 
ment of New Plymouth, and covering 
the period December, 1840, to March 

1842 

By 

W. H. SKINNER. 




NEW PLYMOUTH: 
Taranaki Herald and Budget Print, Currie Street. 

1923 








fSTORlCAL 
OfeRCMSf j&lm- 

Audkland A^ricultiiral ihd 
Pastoral Association and 
Early Days in, Auckland 
Province, from 1826 to 1 893 



X^Df420 



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ANDREW ANDERSON 
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J. ANDERSON, Junior 

accountant 

F. N. LAWRENCE, a.r.a.wz., a.i.a.n.z. 

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1938 



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"The Plain Points 
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— BY — 

Dr. J. J. NORTH 



! 



J 



?• 



ONE SHILLING. 



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1538 



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Fragments 

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U 

"Shafto" 




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.11 



6^ #2 




CENTENNIAL 

of the 

Treaty of Waitangi 

6 FEBRUARY 1 940 



SOUVENIR 
PROGRAMME 






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A Brief Story of the Beginning and Early 
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MORIORI 

The Morioris 

of the 

South Island 

T 
By Herries Beattie 



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MEMORIES 

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BEING REMINISENCES OF 

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BEING. 



Notes collected from the descendants or the Aboriginal People of 
the Rangitaiki Valleg and the Ure-wera Countrg apd from the 
fvlataatua Tribes. 



BY. 



©lsboi) mm* 



■-v 






GlYEX BY MEMBERS OF THE NgATI-MaNAWA, NGATI-WlIAitE, TUHOE, NOATI-APA, 

Xgati-Awa, Ngati-Hamtja asd PAinm-HEr Tribes. 



eALLJRIGHTS RESERVED.) 



evements, retains 
osmits orally the most leugthy 
raditions, poems, and genealogies 
with singular facility and precision. 
Preserved in such a manner were the 
poems of Homer, the Indian Yedas, 
the Kalevala of the Finnish race, that 
great epic poem of 22,000 verses. 



•Collect (or gather) the chips (i.e. frag- 
ments) of Mataatua. Mataatua is the 
name of the canoe by which the ancestors 
of these tribes came to New Zealand. 



his wnudenn\ • 
Ocean of Kiwl^i^. 
and ceremonies, in 1 

tern of in>th"logy, in hlA^^rtPcTaSju^ 
ancient chants, there can be noted the 
traces of a superior culture to that 
which has obtained among the vari- 
ous divisions of the far-spreading 
Polynesian race within historic time". 
It is an ethnological axiom that when 
a race becomes scattered and isolated 
I in small communities, that race must 






1 



X-DU420 //*? 

"JAMES 

BUSBY 

First British Resident in New Zealand" 



By 

KENNETH H. MELVIN 

Bledisloe Prizeman 

in Oratory 

University of Netv Zealand. 



-J 



/ 




V 



Early Land Settlement in the Wairarapa. 

Mr. Edwin Meredith Relates Past Experiences. 
An Interesting Interview. 

Extract from The Wairarapa Age, Thursday October 18th, 1906. 



It may safely be said tbat there 
ie no one in the Wairarapa who 
can personally speak with greater 
authority in regard to the settlement 
of the land in the "early days" of 
this district than Mr Edwin Mere- 
dith. In those days when towns were 
unknown, when there was no incess- 
ant clamour for the telephone in the 
baokhloaks, wheD, indeed, many 
settlers were glad if by hard and un- 
remitting toil they could earn 
simply a livelihood, Mr Meredith 
was, in the face of hardships and 
privations, "caning out" a home 
in the bankblocks, such as cannot 
be found anywbeie in New Zealand 
to-day, and at the same time, In 
conjunction with other settlers 
sittilarly engaged, layiug the found- 
ation of the prosperity and progress 
of the country. Recently a repre- 
sentative of the "Wairarapa Age" 
approached Mr Meredith in regard 
to an imerview, when Mr Meredith 
courteously related some of his past 
experiences. 

IN 1853. 

"I understand, Mr Meredith," 
■aid our representative, "that you 
came to New Z'aiand in the early 
days?" 

"Yes, 1 arrived in New Zealand in 
1850 and I first visited South 
Wairarapa in 1851, 1 think. Very 
little of the land was settled in 
those days From Te Ore Ore to 
tbe Wairarapa Lake there were only 
12 settlers, all holding native 
leases. A good tenure though under 
disagreeable landlords, but I will 
explain that later. The names of 
the settlers at tbat time were Messrs 
W. Donald (Masterlon), Janus 
Nortbwood, (Te Ore Ore), Thomas 
Nortbwood, (near Hnrunuiorangl), 
Borlase, (near Papawai), on tbe 
Walohini) Smith and Revaus, 
(Huangaroa), Bidwill (Luke), and 
on tbe opposite side to Mr Hid will 
and extending in the direction of 
Fulliser Bay were Messrs Gillies, 
MoMaster, Peter' Hume, Kelly and 
Russell, with Matthews on the next 
bank of the lover Lake. The only 
way it was then passible to travel 
to Wellington was to go right down 
tbe Wairarapa Valley to Palliser 



Bay, swim tbe Lake near tbe 
month, and folio* the coast round 

to Wellington. 

THE NEW ZEALAND LAND 

COMPANY. 
"It may be said tbat New Zealand 
was first colonized by the New Zaal- 
and Land Company. Mr Gibbon 
Wakefield, I bolieve, represanted 
the Company, but not being a prac- 
tical man — with no business quali- 
fications, without sympathy with, 
or knowledge of, tbe natives, be 
was about as fitted for tbe position 
as I am to be a bishop. He was a 
clever man, but a theorist — bis 
ideals were good, but as a man of 
action he was a failure. Broadly the 
position was that tbe Company had 
got hold of certain lands in the im- 
mediate vicinity of Wellington— (So 
inaccurate were their surveys and 
oareless in their land transactions, 
that they actually sold a nim.b >r of 
sections to people in England, that 
bad no existence as Ian I — being 
de facto, enoroai btrents on Cook 
Strait) — but having secured certain 
concessions they had no ability for 
oolonizing, confronted as they were 
by a large popnlation of hostile 
natives. While the New Zealand 
Company were muddling on, settle- 
ment in tbe neighbourhood of Wel- 
lington became very conjested. The 
cattle and sheep that bad been 
brought to the country bad increased 
and there was no room for them at all. 
It was then that men like tbe late 
Mi W. Donald and others 1 hav„ 
mentioned made their way by tbe 
coast to tbe Wairarapa Valley, 
where they took leases from the 
natives. 

IN SIR GEORGE GREY'S TIME. 

"When 1 first came to settle in 
Ih" North L-land Sir George Grey 
was Governor-General and it was 
probably by bis advioe tbat it was 
decided that all acquisitions of land 
from the Natives should be made by 
purchase and tbat nu land should be 
taken by force or by occupation of 
pioneer settlers as was the esse in 
Australia. As the Native population 
of tbe South Island was very 
sparse, large areas of land were ac- 



J 



2 
'^7 



Sir GEORGE GREY. 






* 



• , !:.•_'■_ ■•:.. ■ - 



X-DU 420 
*1 



6"6 






" * ■ -"*■■■* - 



USD 



I s 



TAUPO HAURAU 



INCIDENTS OF A TRIBE 



G. H. SCHOLEFIELD 









/ 









■ I 



I -■>. 



X-DU 420 



£*-*' 



$5\ 









PUKAPUKA-TAUIRA. 



1 Tiriti o Waitangi 



i 

m 
m 

n 




i 
i 
© 
© 
1 

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si 

TE KAWENATA Kl TE IWI MAORI H 

HE KORERO KOHIKOHI, WHAI-MANA. H 

1 



1840 




9 

I Book on Treaty of Waitangi | 







1840 









ID With Collection of Official Records. 

IS Speeches and Letters by English and Maori LJ 

|—i Authorities on the Magna Charta of New Zealand r^i 

u u 

M Reprinted from Maori Newspaper TE MANUKURA. HD 

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